Press release 2016-12-20

80 million to new climate policy programme

With a backing of 80 million Swedish crowns Mistra’s new climate policy programme, Mistra Nepsis, will aim at the tough target of achieving zero net greenhouse gases emissions by the year 2045. IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute leads the programme and together with Chalmers University of Technology and numerous other universities, industries and organizations they make up a strong consortium. The focus is on three areas: housing, transport and transport infrastructure.

– We are pleased and honoured that Mistra has faith in our ability to carry out the programme. This initiative comes along at just the right moment. With the Paris Agreement the world's nations committed to limiting the global temperature increase to well below two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. Now is the time to translate words into actions. Sweden faces a profound transformation of society towards a climate neutral economy. Mistra Nepsis will delineate the possible contours of this makeover, says Lars Zetterberg at IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.

To date this single programme is one of Mistra’s biggest undertakings. Mistra Nepsis (Non-Emission Products and Services in Sweden) aims to leverage climate neutral products and services – partly targeting new technologies and partly the development of instruments and business models. The programme will attempt to lay down guidelines for the reorientation of Swedish industry that is necessary if the goal of zero net emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere is to be reached before 2045.

To accomplish this we will attempt a cross-sector analysis of supply chains in the building and transport sectors and the transport infrastructure. Together, these account for 75 per cent of Sweden's total carbon emissions.

– We want to demonstrate how Sweden and Swedish companies can become leaders in providing the products and services with low carbon emissions that the global market demands, says Philip Johnson, professor of sustainable energy at Chalmers.

Mistra comments the research programme as follows:

– This initiative will support both Sweden's international commitments under the Paris Agreement as well as national climate objectives by addressing society’s carbon dioxide emissions, says Åke Iverfeldt, Mistra's CEO. Our hope is that Mistra Nepsis will lead to concrete technical solutions and come up with new proposals as to how society and authorities can apply instruments and other measures able to deliver positive results.

– We have brought together a solid group of academic organizations, several of which have participated in Mistra’s past climate research efforts. Another strength of this proposal, stressed by the board in its decision, is the embracing of a holistic research approach that includes multiple sectors of society, says Thomas Nilsson, head of the programme at Mistra.

With a total budget of SEK 80 million, spread over four years – where Mistra accounts for 56 million and participating organizations account for the remaining 24 million – this single programme is one of of the foundation’s biggest undertakings to date. The programme will start in spring 2017 and run for four years.

For more information, please contact:
Lars Zetterberg, lars.zetterberg@ivl.se, +46 (0)10 788 65 57
Philip Johnson, filip.johnsson@chalmers.se, +46 (0)31 772 14 49

Mistra Nepsis partners: IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute (programme host), Department of Energy and Environment  at Chalmers University of Technology, the departments of Energy and Physical Resource Theory, Gothenburg School of Economics, Linköping University, KTH, SDSN-NE, Resources for the Future in Washington, DC, the Centre for European Policy Studies in Brussels and the DIW German Institute for Economic Research in Berlin; as well as some 20 other organizations – the Swedish Transport Agency, Volvo Cars, Volvo AB, Cementa, JM, NCC, Skanska, Thomas Betong, A–Betong, Voesalpine, Outukumpu, Stena Metall, Fortum, Gothenburg Energy, Energiforsk, Danske Bank, Västra Götalandsregionen, the Municipality of Uppsala, the Haga Initiative, Fores, the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency and the California Air Resources Board.